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Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation
Editor-in-chief: Peter R. Martin, MD
Vanderbilt University, USA
ISSN: 2324-9005
NLM ID: 101624705  
Frequency: Quarterly
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Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal and aims to publish the most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the mode of research articles, review articles, case reports, short communications, etc. in all areas of addiction science and making them accessible online freely without any restrictions or any other subscriptions to researchers worldwide.

Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation focuses on the topics include, but are not limited to:

The journal is using Editorial Manager System for quality in peer-review process. Editorial Manager is an online manuscript submission, review and tracking systems. Review processing is performed by the editorial board members of Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation or outside experts; at least two independent reviewers approval followed by editor approval is required for acceptance of any citable manuscript. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the system, hopefully to publication. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions to the editor. Editors can manage the whole submission/review/revise/publish process.
 
Submit manuscript at http://www.editorialmanager.com/scitechnol/ or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at editor.jabtr@scitechnol.com or editor.jabtr@scitechnol.org
 
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation is organizing & supporting 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Addiction Research & Therapy which is to be held on August 3-5, 2015 at Florida, USA. Special interest and theme of the conference is “Accentuate knowledge and explore new treatment regimen for Addiction”.

 

 
Current Issue
Co-Curricular Drug Abuse Treatment in a University: Implementation and Evaluation   Research Article
Abidemi Olubunmi Bello, Peter Olutunde Onifade, John O. Sotunsa, Mojisola D Ariyo, Elizabeth Okonkwo, and Olufikayo O Banjo
J Addict Behav Ther Rehabil 2014, 3:4    doi: 10.4172/2324-9005.1000128
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Co-Curricular Drug Abuse Treatment in a University: Implementation and Evaluation

Background: Babcock University, Nigeria, screened the students at the point of academic registration and implemented a cocurricular treatment programme for those with positive urine drug test. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immediate outcomes of the programme. Methods: The study was approved by the university’s research ethics committee. The participants were the students who screened positive to urine drug test and were hitherto suspended from school to receive treatment but were offered the option of continuing their studies while receiving treatment in the co-curricular treatment programme. Thirty of the students took the offer and participated in this study. They had a 12-week outpatient drug abuse treatment based on the Living in Balance core curriculum. The main outcome measures were urine drug test and Addiction Severity Index. The client’s satisfaction and treatment perception were also assessed. Results: The 30 clients comprised of 25 (83%) males. Mean age was 21.3 (sd=2.88). The most common primary drug of abuse was cannabis (66.7%). The rate of retention in the programme was 86.7%: The rate of positive urine drug test reduced from 100% pretreatment to 3.8% post treatment. There was 36% - 71% decrease in the domain specific Addiction severity index. There was also significant difference between the pre and post treatment global addiction severity index (z= -0.2845, p=0.004). More than 95% of the clients reported that treatment programme was good or excellent and would refer a friend in need of similar help to the programme. The mean Treatment Perception score by the clients was 28.95 (sd=6.09, min=17, max=40) out of the maximum obtainable of 40.

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Causative Agents of Substance Induced Psychotic Disorder amongst Inpatients and Outpatients of a South East Asian Tertiary Addictions Management Service   Research Article
Lambert Tchern Kuang Low and Kim Eng Wong
J Addict Behav Ther Rehabil 2014, 3:4    doi: 10.4172/2324-9005.1000129
 Preview

Causative Agents of Substance Induced Psychotic Disorder amongst Inpatients and Outpatients of a South East Asian Tertiary Addictions Management Service

Introduction: There is a paucity of local research on patients with substance induced psychotic disorder and their causative agents in South East Asia including Singapore. This study examines the main substances contributing to substance induced psychosis in patients receiving treatment at a tertiary addictions management service in Singapore. It also identifies factors predictive of subsequent conversion to a primary psychotic disorder. Methodology: Retrospective case-note analysis of 48 patients referred to the National Addictions Management Service between 01/04/2007-31/03/2012 with a diagnosis of substance induced psychotic disorder and no prior history of a primary psychotic disorder. Results: Amphetamine, alcohol, benzodiazepines and codeine were most commonly associated with substance induced psychosis. 10 (20.8%) of the patients were re-diagnosed to a primary psychotic disorder. The younger the age of onset of substance induced psychotic disorder, the higher the risk of conversion to a primary psychotic disorder. Conclusion: Illegal and so-called prescription drugs can cause SIPD or precipitate a primary psychosis in those with an underlying psychotic diathesis, and the risk of the latter is higher the younger the age of onset of the SIPD. This message should be used more often in primary and secondary prevention strategies.

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Establishing the Behavioral Function of Video Game Use: Development of the Video Game Functional Assessment   Research Article
Matthew E Sprong, Frank D. Buono, James Bordieri, Nick Mui and Thomas D. Upton
J Addict Behav Ther Rehabil 2014, 3:4    doi: 10.4172/2324-9005.1000130
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Establishing the Behavioral Function of Video Game Use: Development of the Video Game Functional Assessment

A great deal of attention has been focused on individuals who play video and computer games despite physical and psychological consequences. Unfortunately, instruments that have been developed to determine problematic gaming have not completely measured the behavioral component of video game addiction. Identifying the behavioral functions of video game play would allow for the development of behavioral interventions specifically targeted at reducing or replacing those functions. A behavioral perspective may provide valuable information as to why gamers continue to play video games despite encountering difficulties in other areas of their lives as a result of their video gaming habits. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the four reinforcing functions that maintain video game play and develop an instrument to measure these functions. Results supported a three-factor measurement model associated with the functions that maintain continued video game play, including (a) escape, (b) tangible, and (c) attention. Discussion and implications are provided.

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Gambling: Cultural Factors, Motivations and Impacts on Quality of Life   Book Review
Tariku A. Abdi
J Addict Behav Ther Rehabil 2014, 3:4    doi: 10.4172/2324-9005.1000131
 Preview

Gambling: Cultural Factors, Motivations and Impacts on Quality of Life

This is a book review. In this book review, the author explored gambling motivations and the impact of gambling on quality of life of the gamblers and families, communities and societies of the gamblers. In the review, the author addressed cultural components like cultural values and acculturations influence adolescents and young adult gamblers initiation and maintenance of gambling and problem gambling. In the review, the researcher also addressed that adolescents and young adults are motivated to gamble for various reasons like entertainment, excitement, amusement, learning and accomplishing, and also, serious cognitive bias, risk-prone attitudes, and higher levels of stress and anxiety. Researches also indicated that there is gender difference on what motivate gamblers to initiate and maintain gambling and problem gambling. Finally, the author addressed that with respect to the impact of gambling on the quality of life, public health position recognizes that gambling yields both potential costs (like a wide range of difficulties on the individuals, families, and communities either indirectly or directly but also negative consequences of gambling like disorders) and benefits (like sense of connectedness and socialization through discretionary leisure time entertainment, enhancing the income of the individuals, strengthening memory, coping strategies and etc) that affect all aspects of the community, including health and socioeconomic dimensions.

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