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Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders
Editor-in-chief: Bahram H. Arjmandi, PhD
Florida State University, USA
ISSN: 2324-9323
NLM ID:101618886
Frequency: Bimonthly
 

Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders (JFND) is a peer-reviewed  scholarly journal which publishes the most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the mode of original articles, review articles, case reports, short communications, etc. in the interdisciplinary areas of Food & Nutrition Disorders. JFND is an online Hybrid Model journal which offers authors a choice in publishing their research through subscription as well as open access for high visibility, unlimited access, usage, increased citations.

Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders primarily focuses on the topics: 

Review processing is performed by the editorial board members of Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders or outside experts; at least two independent reviewers approval followed by editor approval is required for acceptance of any citable manuscript. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the online tracking system, hopefully to publication.
Manuscripts can be submitted via Online Submission or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at editor.jfnd@scitechnol.com or editor.jfnd@scitechnol.org
Journal of Food & Nutritional Disorders is organizing & supporting 4th International Conference and Exhibition on Nutrition & Food Sciences at Chicago, USA from October 26-28, 2015.

 

 
Current Issue
Developing Theory-Based Measurement Tools for Improving Diet Compliance in Head and Neck Cancer Patients   Research Article
Rogers LQ, Verhulst S, Rao K, Malone J, Robbs R and Robbins KT
J Food Nutr Disor 2015, 4:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-9323.1000166
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Developing Theory-Based Measurement Tools for Improving Diet Compliance in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

Increasing compliance with diet recommendations is critical for improving health, quality of life, and survival among head and neck cancer (HNCa) patients. The social cognitive theory is a potentially useful behavioral theory framework for improving compliance but measurement tools assessing theory constructs related to diet compliance in HNCa patients are needed. Therefore, our study aim was to pilot test social cognitive theory construct measures, including prevalence and preliminary associations with self-reported compliance with physician or dietitian diet recommendations.Cross-sectional survey completed by 33 HNCa patients followed in an out-patient academic otolaryngology clinic.T

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Some Chemical and Microbiological Characteristics of Shawerma Meat Product   Research Article
Mandour H. Abdelhai, Abdel Moneim E. Sulieman and EI Rakha B Babiker
J Food Nutr Disor 2015, 4:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-9323.1000167
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Some Chemical and Microbiological Characteristics of Shawerma Meat Product

This study aimed to determine the chemical and microbiological quality characteristics of Shawerma meat product which is consumed largely as snack food in many Arabic countries including Sudan. Fifteen samples of Shawerma were collected from various sites in Wad Madani (central Sudan). These sites included, AlsugAlkabeer (A), AlsugAlsageer (B) and AlsugAlshabi (C). In addition, control samples of Shawerma were prepared at the laboratory using the most common method followed in Wad Madani. The results indicated that there were notable differences in most of the chemical components of raw and cooked Shawerma. The pH value of the various Shawerma samples falls between 4.8 ± 0.1 and 5.4 ± 0.05. However, the protein content of raw Shawerma (19.25 ± 0.9 to 23 ± 0.41%) was lower than that of cooked Shawerma (22.75 ± to 28 ± 0.9%). The fat content in raw Shawerma ranged between 3.44 ± 0.32 and 6 ± 0.1%, while in cooked Shawerma, it ranged between 4.76 ± to 10 ± 0.15%.

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Risk Factors of Dyslipidemia in Hypertensive Patients in Selected Urban and Rural Areas in Indonesia   Research Article
Sartika RAD, Wulandari RA, Ompusunggu IJ and Sutrisna B
J Food Nutr Disor 2015, 4:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-9323.1000168
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Risk Factors of Dyslipidemia in Hypertensive Patients in Selected Urban and Rural Areas in Indonesia

Currently, Indonesia is in epidemiology transition regarding the burden of infectious diseases, as well as the threat of noncommunicable diseases. The main risk factors of developing cardiovascular disease are smoking habit, hypertension and dyslipidemia; the latter two often occurring simultaneously. The purpose of this study was to obtain a predictive model of the occurrence of dyslipidemia in hypertensive patients. Study design was a cross sectional study. The selection of samples was ‘simple random sampling’ based on the medical records of hypertensive patients. The results showed that 47.6% of patients with hypertension manifest dyslipidemia (39.2% rural and 59.3% urban areas). Risk factors of dyslipidemia in hypertensive patient in urban areas was working status after controlled by BMI (Body Mass Index), and fat intake, while in rural areas was gender after controlled by fat intake, and fried food consumption.

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Polyphenolics from Black Spanish Red Wine (Vitis ‘aestivalis’) have Cytotoxic Activity in Colon Cancer Cells and Repress Prooncogenic microRNA-27a   Research Article
Del Follo-Martinez A, Banerjee N, Li X, Talcott S, Safe S and Mertens-Talcott S
J Food Nutr Disor 2015, 4:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-9323.1000169
 Preview

Polyphenolics from Black Spanish Red Wine (Vitis ‘aestivalis’) have Cytotoxic Activity in Colon Cancer Cells and Repress Prooncogenic microRNA-27a

The anticancer activity of polyphenolics from Black Spanish wine (Vitis ‘aestivalis’), was investigated in HT-29 colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. Wine polyphenolics significantly inhibited cell proliferation from 18.7 – 300 μg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL over a period of 24h with an IC50 value of 258 μg GAE/mL.Polyphenolics also decreased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased the antioxidant capacity as determined by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay (ORAC). The growth inhibitory effects of the polyphenolics were accompanied by an induction of cleavage cleaved caspase-3. Polyphenolic treatment decreased the expression of specifity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, these responses were accompanied by decreased expression of the Sp-dependent survival gene survivin. The wine polyphenolics also decreased the expression of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) and induced zinc finger protein ZBTB10 (anSp-repressor) mRNA which is consistent with previous study. This was confirmed by transfection of colon cells with the specific mimic for miR-27a and wine polyphenolics partially reversed the effects of mimic.

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