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Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry
Editorial Board: Anton G. Endress, PhD
 University of Illinois, USA  view all
ISSN: 2327-4417
Frequency: Quarterly
 

Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry is a peer-reviewed scholarly online journal and aims to publish the most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the mode of original articles, review articles, case reports, short communications, etc. in all major themes pertaining to biodiversity & Forest management and Wild life management making them accessible online freely without any restrictions or any other subscriptions to researchers worldwide.

Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry focuses on the topics that include:

The journal is using Editorial Manager System for quality in review process. Editorial Manager is an online manuscript submission, review and tracking systems. Review processing is performed by the editorial board members of Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry or outside experts; at least two independent reviewers approval followed by editor approval is required for acceptance of any citable manuscript. Authors may submit manuscripts and track their progress through the system, hopefully to publication. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions to the editor. Editors can manage the whole submission/review/revise/publish process.

Submit manuscript at http://www.editorialmanager.com/scitechnol/ or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at editor.jbmf@scitechnol.com or editor.jbmf@scitechnol.org

Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry is organizing & supporting 3rd International Conference on Biodiversity & Sustainable Energy Development  during June 24-26, 2014 in Valencia Conference Centre, Spain with the theme of Milestones of innovative scientific research in biodiversity and its allied areas.

SciTechnol-Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry (JBMF) will be the forum for the publication of selected papers from The International Conference on Green Chemistry and Sustainable Engineering, with the aim of exchanging knowledge through the pioneers in the field and encouraging them towards the advancement of scientific community. Being official Journal of congress, SciTechnol-JBMF publishes the selected papers of the Congress (Conference Proceedings) as a Special Issue.

 
Current Issue
Editors & Editorial Board Members  
J Biodivers Manage Forestry 2014, 3:1   
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Out of the Woods: Mitigating Negative Impacts of Unused Forest Roads on Amphibians with Woody Debris   Research Article
David LeGros, Brad Steinberg and David Lesbarrères
J Biodivers Manage Forestry 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2327-4417.1000119
 Preview

Out of the Woods: Mitigating Negative Impacts of Unused Forest Roads on Amphibians with Woody Debris

Habitat loss and fragmentation are among the most serious threats facing amphibians. While less noticeable than highways and with typically little vehicle traffic, extensive networks of logging roads also fragment habitats and some species avoid crossing these roads. Woody debris is an important habitat feature for many amphibians providing refuges and foraging opportunities for species sheltering underneath. In an attempt to mitigate the negative impacts of habitat fragmentation by logging roads in Algonquin Provincial Park, Canada, we sampled amphibians crossing an unused logging road using pitfall traps and tested several types of woody debris treatments. Using the ‘before’ and ‘after’, ‘control’ and ‘impact’ (BACI) model, we compared captures of Red-backed Salamanders (Plethodon cinereus), Red Efts (Notophthalmus viridescens) and Green Frogs (Lithobates clamitans) in 2010 (pre-treatment) and 2011 (post-treatment); the treatments consisted of either hardwood mulch, conifer brush, timbers and a control with no woody debris. Our results with pitfall traps indicated specific responses to mitigation with Green Frogs showing positive responses to the brush and timber treatments, while both salamander species showed little response.

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Alpha, Beta and Gamma Diversity of the Birds in a Tropical Landscape of Southern Mexico   Research Article
Jorge E. Ramírez-Albores, José L. Rangel-Salazar, Miguel A. Martínez-Morales and Jorge L. León
J Biodivers Manage Forestry 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2327-4417.1000120
 Preview

Alpha, Beta and Gamma Diversity of the Birds in a Tropical Landscape of Southern Mexico

Understanding the relationships between bird diversity and landscape structure in tropical forest fragments is paramount for the conservation of its biodiversity, particularly when tropical forest is under management. In this study, the alpha diversity variation of the bird community was evaluated, and its relationships with area, forest cover, environmental heterogeneity and altitude in a fragmented landscape of tropical forest in southern Mexico. A total of 243 bird species were recorded in the entire landscape. Alpha diversity spatially varies between sites from 123 to 158 species; this variation was explained by habitat heterogeneity. Only five vulnerable species increased their abundance with area, tropical forest cover and habitat heterogeneity increases. Beta diversity between sites ranged from 3% to 57%, and the average turnover between the study sites was 43%. Gamma diversity was largely determined by beta diversity than alpha diversity.

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Assessment of Elephant (Elephas Maximus) Mortality along Palakkad-Coimbatore Railway Stretch of Kerala and Tamil Nadu Using Geospatial Technology   Research Article
Nidhi Jha, Kiranmay Sarma and Prodyut Bhattacharya
J Biodivers Manage Forestry 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2327-4417.1000121
 Preview

Assessment of Elephant (Elephas Maximus) Mortality along Palakkad-Coimbatore Railway Stretch of Kerala and Tamil Nadu Using Geospatial Technology

Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) are facing serious threats due to the train-hits and a major concern for the environmentalists and common man. Habitat fragmentation, degradation of habitat quality, forest cover loss and lacking in management of physical barriers could be attributed for these accidents. The present study is carried out in Palakkad- Coimbatore railway sector of Tamil Nadu and Kerala states of India to find out the problem sites of incidents using landscape matrices, detection of changes in land use/ cover using temporal remote sensing data and its relation with human elephant conflict and to predict the future scenario based on the present findings. The study reveals that there are noticeable conversion of forests from dense to open (7.12% and 2.75%) during 1989 to 1999 and 1999 to 2012. During 1989 to 1999 and 1999 to 2012 about 5 and 2 percent of the dense forests were changed to other non-forest type,
respectively.

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Diversity and Regeneration Aspects of Medicinal Plants at Devimane, Uttara Kannada District, Karnataka, Central Western Ghats   Research Article
G. R. Rao, G. Krishnakumar, Sumesh N. Dudani, M. D. Subash Chandran and T. V. Ramachandra
J Biodivers Manage Forestry 2014, 3:1    doi: 10.4172/2327-4417.1000122
 Preview

Diversity and Regeneration Aspects of Medicinal Plants at Devimane, Uttara Kannada District, Karnataka, Central Western Ghats

Plants form an important source of traditional medicines for a major portion of population living in the tropical countries, since time immemorial. The Western Ghats of India is ranked among the 34 global biodiversity hotspots and is a storehouse of exemplarily rich biodiversity including numerous medicinal plants. However, excessive anthropogenic pressures on this ecosystem have resulted in severe depletion of natural resources and hence, this study was taken up to highlight the medicinal plant diversity and their regeneration aspects in Devimane area of Uttara Kannada district in Karnataka. Forest survey was carried out using a transect-based quadrat method revealing the presence of 348 plant species and about 40% of them are endemic to the Western Ghats-SriLanka region.

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