International Publisher of Science, Technology and Medicine

 
 
Share this
 
 
 
Track Your Manuscript
 
 
 
 
Analgesia & Resuscitation : Current Research
Editorial Board: Patrick M. Dougherty, PhD
 The University of Texas, USA  view all
ISSN: 2324-903X
Frequency: Quarterly
 
Analgesia & Resuscitation: Current Research is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that aims to publish the most complete and reliable source of information on the discoveries and current developments in the form of original articles, full/mini reviews, case reports, commentaries, letter to editor, rapid/short communications, etc. in all areas pertaining to analgesia and resuscitation, making them available online freely without any restrictions or subscription to researchers worldwide.

Analgesia & Resuscitation: Current Research publishes results of research on Analgesia, Anesthesia, Resuscitation, Critical care. 

The Journal is using Editorial Manager System for maintaining quality review process. Editorial Manager is an online manuscript submission, review and tracking system. Review process is performed by the editorial board members of Analgesia & Resuscitation: Current Research or outside experts; the validation by at least two independent reviewers followed by the editor’s approval is required for the acceptance of any citable manuscript for publication in the Journal. Authors may submit manuscripts and track its progress through the system, hopefully to publication. Reviewers can download manuscripts and submit their opinions to the editor in the Editorial Manager System. Editors can manage the entire submission/review/revision/publication process.

Submit manuscript at http://www.editorialmanager.com/scitechnol/ or send as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at editor.arcr@scitechnol.com or editor.arcr@scitechnol.org

Analgesia & Resuscitation: Current Research is organizing and supporting 3rd International Conference on Surgery and Anesthesia during November 17-19, 2014 to be held at Chicago, USA.

 
Current Issue
Postoperative Analgesia by Continuous Interscalene Block of 0.2% Ropivacaine: Comparison of the Two Different Infusion Rates   Case Report
Tomoki Nishiyama
Analg Resusc: Curr Res 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-903X.1000113
 Preview

Postoperative Analgesia by Continuous Interscalene Block of 0.2% Ropivacaine: Comparison of the Two Different Infusion Rates

Continuous interscalene block at a rate of 4-10 mL/h has been used for postoperative analgesia of upper extremities. However, with these infusion rates, sometimes local anesthetic leaks from the catheter insertion site. Therefore, lower infusion rate is preferable. The present study investigated whether a lower infusion rate (2 mL/h) of interscalene ropivacaine could be useful on postoperative analgesia of upper extremities.

|  Full Text |   PDF   
Sepsis- Induced Refractory Status Epilepticus: A Case Report   Case Report
Katarina Tomulic Brusich, Ivana Acan and Natasa Viskovic Filipcic
Analg Resusc: Curr Res 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-903X.1000114
 Preview

Sepsis- Induced Refractory Status Epilepticus: A Case Report

Sepsis is often accompanied by various degrees of mental status deterioration. It can range from slight confusion to coma and can be, although rarely, accompanied by focal neurological signs. Presentation as status epilepticus requires early recognition and treatment due to the fact that it carries a significant amount of complications and mortality.

|  Full Text |   PDF   
Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity with Induction Dose of Intravenous Anesthetics   Research Article
Tomoki Nishiyama
Analg Resusc: Curr Res 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-903X.1000115
 Preview

Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity with Induction Dose of Intravenous Anesthetics

No studies are available to compare directly the changes of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by induction doses of thiopental, propofol, midazolam and ketamine. We hypothesized that CBF would decrease in the order of thiopental, midazolam, and propofol, but increase with ketamine at induction of anesthesia. The present study compared the change of CBF with induction doses of these anesthetics by measuring CBF velocity (CBFV) using Transcranial Doppler.

|  Full Text |   PDF   
Neuromuscular Blocking Agents and Therapeutic Hypothermia Post Cardiac Arrest in the Intensive Care Unit: Knowledge to Practice   Research Article
Glen Gardner and Sandra MacDonald
Analg Resusc: Curr Res 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-903X.1000116
 Preview

Neuromuscular Blocking Agents and Therapeutic Hypothermia Post Cardiac Arrest in the Intensive Care Unit: Knowledge to Practice

Therapeutic hypothermia is an effective in-hospital treatment modality post ventricular fibrillation cardiac arrest, but there is a need for advanced nursing knowledge and skills to implement the treatment safely. This paper discusses one specially designed education module that was developed and implemented at the Rouge Valley Health System Hospital in Ontario, to address this need. The Knowledge-To-Action framework was used to guide the development of the module. Twelve critical care registered nurses participated in the module and findings from the project showed that the teaching learning approach of a self-paced learning package, lectures, discussions, and return demonstrations had a positive impact on nurses’ knowledge and confidence in caring for these patients. Busy ICU nurses need flexibility in the delivery of education in the clinical setting, and this project showed that a flexible approach can help to prepare nurses to care for patients receiving therapeutic hypothermia.

|  Full Text |   PDF   
Transbronchial Migration of Double Lumen Tube during Lobectomy   Case Report
Nishant Kumar, Ranadhir Mitra, Ranju Singh and Aruna Jain
Analg Resusc: Curr Res 2014, 3:2    doi: 10.4172/2324-903X.1000117
 Preview

Transbronchial Migration of Double Lumen Tube during Lobectomy

Proper positioning of double lumen tube (DLT) during thoracic surgery remains essential for successful lung separation and hence surgery. Bronchoscopic confirmation of DLT is the gold standard but the position of DLT is dynamically influenced by change in patient position and intraoperative manipulation. We report a case of displacement and transbronchial migration of DLT during right upper lobectomy.

|  Full Text |   PDF